Toni Price – Hey

Hey is the sophomore album most artists only dream of making. Featuring five tracks penned by her Nashville friend Gwil Owen, Hey reveals Toni’s innate talent of taking the words and melodies of others and making them into her very own soulful creations. Featuring the anthems “Hey” and “Tumbleweed,” the eternal longing of “Misty Moonlight,” the heart break of “Something,” the fiery “Too Close to You” and the definitive version of Butch Hancock’s “Bluebird” among others, Hey builds on and enhances the artistry begun with Swim Away.

Here’s an excerpt of the AllMusic Review by Hal Horowitz

If there was ever a female voice that conveyed the diverse qualities of the fertile Austin, TX music scene, Toni Price would be on anyone’s short list for the honors. On her second album she wraps her lazy, husky drawl around some terrific material, much of it penned by Gwil Owen who wrote or co-wrote seven of these 13 tunes. Price also utilizes the cream of the city’s extensive crop of musical talent with drummers Barry Frosty Smith, Doyle Bramhall ,and Lisa Pankratz joining fiddler Champ Hood and guitarists Scrappy Jud Newcomb, Casper Rawls, David Grissom, and Derek O’Brien on a set that mixes country, folk, jazz, torch, blues, rock, and twang with an effortlessness unique to Austin’s distinctive groove. Other than a rollicking cover of Dylan’s “Obviously 5 Believers,” the material is obscure and in the case of Owen’s contributions, seems crafted specifically for her voice. And what a voice it is. Price’s Southern influences are reflected in a style that ranges from sexy to sassy, yet stays soulful regardless of the song’s genre. Nothing is rushed and the groove is predominantly low-key even on the more upbeat tracks.

AllMusic Review – Hey by Hal Horowitz

Hey (1995)

Hey (1995)

Hey (1995)

Hey (1995)

CDs $15 each +$2 shipping


CDs $15 each +$2 shipping